Note 1: - QC indicates that a qualified contractor is recommended.

Note 2:  Although the use of "...by a qualified contractor" looks excessive when you are looking at the library, it is included in many narratives because when problems identified during the inspection become part of the negotiations, sellers are often given only the narratives, not the entire report. To avoid potentially dangerous or improper attempts at repairs or corrections made by those unqualified, it's important that this language be included.

 

The following are narrative examples from the InterNACHI Narrative Library:

ROOF

Deterioration: moderate

Asphalt shingles exhibited moderate general deterioration that will not affect their ability to protect the structure.

 

Severe Deterioration

Asphalt shingles covering the roof of this home were old, exhibited severe general deterioration and may need to be replaced soon. They appeared to be adequately protecting the structure at the time of the inspection. 

 

End of useful life- QC

The asphalt shingle roof exhibited severe general deterioration and appeared to be at or near the end of its long-term service life. You should consult with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for replacement.

 

Cap shingles: loose/missing

Cap shingles were missing from the roof.  Any missing cap shingles should be replaced by a qualified roofing contractor to avoid damage from roof leakage. If existing fasteners are discovered to be of inadequate length, loss of cap shingles during wind events may continue.

 

Algae

Discoloration of the asphalt shingle roof appeared to be the result of algae growth, a cosmetic issue. Any efforts to remove algae should be made by a qualified contractor.

 

Localized small blisters

Localized portions of the asphalt shingle roof had small blisters visible. Blisters are a cosmetic issue and do not cause premature failure of the shingles or affect their performance. 

 

Craze-cracking: minor

The asphalt shingles exhibited widespread, minor craze-cracking. Craze-cracking is random hairline cracking that is limited to the surface layer of asphalt. It is not considered a defective condition by shingle manufacturers or insurance companies. It is low-quality shingles performing as designed.

 

Cont. flashing, sidewall- no leaks

Sidewalls on the asphalt shingle roof had continuous sidewall flashing installed. Asphalt shingle manufacturers recommend step-flashing be installed at sidewalls. This installation increases the potential for roof leakage. The Inspector observed no signs of leakage that appeared to be connected with this condition. 

 

Continuous flashing, sidewall- AHJ req.

Sidewalls on the asphalt shingle roof had continuous sidewall flashing installed. This installation increases the potential for roof leakage. Asphalt shingle manufacturers recommend step-flashing be installed at sidewalls. Because the property was located in an area designated "high-wind", the building jurisdiction requires continuous sidewall flashing to be installed due to its superior resistance to wind damage. The Inspector observed no signs of past leakage that appeared to be connected with this condition.

 

Cont. sidewall flashing: leaks- QC

Although asphalt shingle manufacturers typically recommend step-flashing be installed at sidewalls, sidewalls on this roof had continuous sidewall flashing installed. This installation increases the potential for roof leakage. The Inspector observed indications that this condition has been a source of past roof leakage. Continuous sidewall flashing should be replaced with step flashing by a qualified roofing contractor.

 

Poorly bonded

Asphalt shingles were poorly bonded to each other. Bonding of shingle sealant strips allows the shingles to act as a single membrane and is the most important factor in the resistance of shingle roofs to wind damage. You should consult with a qualified contractor to determine the best course of action.

 

Bonding: none bonded, old roof- QC

Asphalt shingle sealant strips had failed to bond shingles to each other. Bonding of shingle sealant strips allows the shingles to act as a single membrane and is the single most important factor in the resistance of the shingle roof to wind damage. Shingles have had adequate time to bond. To improve the wind resistance of the roof, you should consult with a qualified contractor to determine the best course of action.

 

Bonding: none bonded, newer roof

Asphalt shingle sealant strips had failed to bond shingles to each other. Bonding of shingle adhesive strips is the single most important factor in the resistance of asphalt shingles to wind damage. Shingles must be exposed to a minimum outside temperature for bonding to take place. Because the home is relatively new, the shingles may not yet have experienced weather warm enough to promote bonding. 

 

Inadequate headlap (concrete tile)

Roof tile appeared to be installed with inadequate headlap (inadequate overlap of tiles in adjacent courses). The typical headlap required is 3 inches. This condition increases the chances of roof leakage. Correction would require removal and reinstallation of all tile, and the purchase of additional matching tiles. You should consult with a qualified roofing contractor to determine the necessity, options, and costs for correction.

 

Damaged slate

Roof slates were damaged and some were missing. This condition increases the potential for roof leakage. You should consult with a qualified slate roof specialist to discuss options and costs for replacement of damaged slates. Not all roofing contractors will be qualified.

 

Caps failed mortar-bond (clay tiles) - QC

Cap tiles were loose, displaced, and missing. This condition appeared to be due to failed mortar bond and indicated weakened mortar bonds across the roof. Falling tiles can cause serious or fatal injury. An evaluation and any necessary work should be performed by a qualified roofing contractor.

 

Metal panel roof: severe damage- QC

The metal panel roof exhibited areas of severe damage that should be repaired by a qualified roofing contractor to avoid roof leakage.

 

Metal shingle roof: moderate damage- QC

The formed metal shingle roof exhibited moderate damage that appeared to be from foot traffic. Metal shingles are fragile. This damage may allow roof leakage. Affected shingles should be replaced as necessary by a qualified roofing contractor.

 

Metal roof galvanic corrosion: fasteners

In some areas, the metal roof was corroded at fasteners. At these areas, fasteners appeared to be of a type of metal different from that of the roof. In the presence of moisture, this condition will create galvanic corrosion. If not corrected, such corrosion will eventually result in roof leakage. Proper fasteners should be installed as necessary by a qualified roofing contractor.

 

EXTERIOR

Overhanging limbs- QC

Large trees near the house have limbs that overhang the home. Limbs may fall due to wood decay, high winds or heavy snow loads, causing injury, death or damage. Significant weakening of large limbs by conditions such as core decay may not be visible by persons without special training. Consider having these trees evaluated by an arborist. Evaluating trees lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.

 

Retaining walls: moderate failure- QC

A retaining wall showed signs of moderate failure such as leaning out at the top. To help extend the service life of the retaining wall you should consult with a foundation repair or landscape contractor to discuss options and costs for installing stabilization.

 

Brick damage above windows/doors- QC

The brick exterior walls had cracking visible above window and door openings indicating a degree of structural failure. This condition should be repaired by a qualified masonry contractor before it becomes more serious.

 

Brick spalling- entire house

Brick covering the home exterior had shed its face, the "face" being the portion of the brick that is exposed to weather. This is typically freeze damage due to use of the wrong type of mortar. Although unsightly, this will have only a very minor effect on the structural integrity of the home.

 

Trim overlaps siding (cementitious siding)

Trim at corners, windows and doors was installed on top of siding. This is an incorrect installation method. The manufacturer's recommended installation method is for siding to extend between trim pieces, with a gap left between siding and trim of approximately 1/8-inch. Gaps should then be filled with an appropriate caulking material.

 

Inadequate clearance: roof, 1"- no damage visible (composite siding)

The composite, horizontal, lapped siding did not have the 1-inch clearance from roof-covering materials recommended by the siding manufacturer. This condition may result in some degree of accelerated deterioration of the siding at these areas. No such damage was visible at the time of the inspection.

 

Asbestos Siding (short version)

Exterior walls were covered with older fiber-cement siding of a type that commonly contained asbestos. Identification of asbestos must be made by a laboratory. Testing of materials exceeds the scope of the General Home Inspection.

 

Asbestos Siding (long version)

Exterior walls were covered with older fiber-cement siding of a type that commonly contained some percentage of asbestos. Confirmation of the presence of asbestos would require analysis by a certified laboratory. Asbestos shingle siding is considered to be a health hazard only when it is in a condition in which the fibers may be inhaled, like when it is sanded or cut.  Requirements for removal, handling and disposal typically vary by area but can be expensive. When you sell the home, if siding has been tested and the presence of asbestos material confirmed, that information must be disclosed. 

 

Spaces exceed 4 ⅜ inches (exterior staircase)

Spaces between handrail assembly balusters allowed passage of a 4 3/8 inches at the open side of this exterior staircase. Widely-accepted modern safety standards  limit spaces between balusters to less than 4 3/8 inches inches for safety reasons. This condition may be hazardous to small children. 

 

 

STRUCTURE

Violated cone-of-compression- SE/QC

In the crawlspace, digging too close to the foundation footings has compromised the Cone of Compression. The Cone of Compression is the area of soil beneath a foundation that supports the weight of the foundation and the home structure above. This soil should remain undisturbed to avoid compromising its structural integrity. The profile of the weight-bearing soil beneath the foundation is roughly cone-shaped, sloping down and out from the bottom corners of the foundation footing at an angle of approximately 45 degrees.
This condition can lead to undermining of the foundation and loss of foundation support leading to structural failure in the affected areas. You should consult with a structural engineer or qualified foundation contractor to determine options and costs for stabilization.

 

Temporary posts used as permanent- QC

Adjustable steel posts used as permanent structural support in the basement appeared to be a type designed for temporary support. The existing posts should be replaced by a qualified contractor with steel posts designed for permanent installation.

 

Crawlspace efflorescence visible

Efflorescence (white powdery deposits) visible on the surface of the concrete foundation walls is an indication of moisture intrusion. Moisture intrusion can affect the ability of the soil beneath the foundation to carry the weight of the structure above and may cause structural damage from soil movement. Moisture intrusion can also damage materials and encourage the growth of microbes such as mold. Action should be taken to identify and correct the source of the moisture.

 

Advanced decay under sliding glass door- QC

Wood framing in the crawlspace beneath the sliding glass door exhibited advanced decay. The source of moisture should be identified and corrected. You should consult with a qualified contractor to discuss options and costs for any necessary framing repair.

 

Grade level intrusion- QC

In the basement, deterioration, stains and/or efflorescence on the interior of the foundation wall at the level of the exterior grade indicated that exterior surface runoff is seeping through the foundation wall at grade level. Action should be taken to divert water away from the foundation exterior.

 

INTERIOR

Misaligned latch bolt- QC

At an interior door in the _____, the doorknob latch bolt did not align with the hole in the strike plate and did not hold the door closed. 

 

Cut door bottoms- QC

Interior room entry doors had inadequate gaps between the door bottoms and floor. This condition will not allow adequate air flow between the HVAC supply air registers located in these rooms and the return air registers located in hallways. This restriction can pressurize the rooms, making them colder during the winter and hotter during the summer. The inspector recommends that the door bottoms be cut to provide gaps of at least 3/4-inch. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

 

Keyed deadbolt- QC

A door to the exterior in the _____ had a deadbolt that required a key for operation from the inside. This condition is unsafe as it may slow or prevent exit during an emergency. Installation of these types of deadbolts is no longer allowed in new construction. All deadbolts in the home that require a key for exit from the home interior be replaced with deadbolts that operate from the inside with a lever. 

 

Risers too tall- older home

Risers at this staircase exceeded 7 3/4 inches (19.6cm) considered the maximum modern safe height. Although this condition is now considered a potential trip/fall hazard, it is not uncommon in older homes such as this one, built during a time period during which safety standards were different from those of today. 

 

Excessive baluster spaces

A horizontal guardrail assembly protecting this stairwell had spaces between handrail components that allowed the passage of a 4-inch sphere. To improve child safety, the Inspector recommends altering the guardrail assembly in a manner which will prevent the passage of a 4-inch sphere. This dimension includes areas beneath and to the sides of the guardrail. All work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

 

ELECTRICAL

Electrical Service Panel

Federal Pacific Stab-lok- QC evaluation

The service panel was made by Federal Pacific and was the Stab-lok model. Federal Pacific Stab-lok model service panels are widely reputed to have a number of problems that can result in a fire or shock/electrocution.  You should consult with a qualified electrical contractor concerning the necessity for replacing this service panel. Information about defective Federal Pacific Stab-lok panels is widely available on the internet.

 

Improper screws- QC

At the electrical service panel, one or more screws holding the front cover in place was an improper type. Pointed, course-thread screws can cut conductors, causing damage that can create electrical arcing (with risk of eye injury and burns), or can energize the metal panel (with risk of electrical shock or electrocution). Blunt, fine-thread screws are required for this application. This condition should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

Unfilled openings- QC

Unfilled holes or knockouts in the electrical service panel may allow persons to come into contact with energized electrical components, may allow insect or rodent entry, or may allow moisture intrusion that can cause corrosion of interior components that can degrade electrical connections. This condition is a potential fire/shock/electrocution hazard and should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

No main bonding jumper- QC

The inspector was unable to locate a main bonding jumper in the electrical service panel. For safety reasons, this defective condition should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

No bonding bushing- QC

No bonding bushing was installed at the electrical service panel. This is an improper condition. Bonding bushings are required where electric raceway/panel connections are made through concentric knockouts. Bonding bushings should be installed where required by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

 

Electrical Distribution (sub-) Panel

 

Ground & neutrals terminate together- QC

Grounding and neutral conductors in this sub-panel terminated on the same bus bar. In sub-panels, neutral conductors must be electrically isolated from the grounding system components. This condition is improper and should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

GFCI: none installed- QC (short)

No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection of electrical receptacles was provided in the home. Although GFCI protection may not have been required at the time the home was built, for safety reasons, the Inspector recommends that the home electrical system be upgraded by a qualified electrical contractor to meet modern safety standards.

 

GFCI: none installed- QC (long)

No Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) protection was provided to circuits controlled by this sub-panel. For safety reasons, the inspector recommends having GFCI protection installed to protect electrical circuits serving the following locations:

  • Bathrooms;
  • The home exterior;
  • Garages;
  • Crawlspaces (at or below grade);
  • Unfinished basements;
  • Kitchens; and
  • Boathouses;

GFCI protection can be provided by:

  1. Replacing the current standard receptacle with a GFCI receptacle.
  2. Replacing the electrical circuit receptacle located closest to the overcurrent protection device with a GFCI receptacle.
  3. Replacing the breaker currently protecting the electrical circuit that contains these receptacles with a GFCI breaker.

 

Breaker taped to OFF- QC

A breaker in this sub-panel was taped to the "off" position. You should ask the seller about this improper condition. The Inspector recommends that an evaluation and any necessary work be performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

 

Branch Circuits

 

Aluminum wiring- QC (short version)

Branch wiring visible inside the service panel contained aluminum wires. Neglected aluminum wiring connections are a potential fire hazard. The Inspector recommends that you have the entire electrical system evaluated- and any necessary maintenance or corrections performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

Aluminum Wiring Hazards- QC (long version)

Circuit branch wiring included single-strand aluminum wiring. Between approximately 1965 and 1973 aluminum wiring was sometimes substituted for copper branch circuit wiring in residential electrical systems.  Neglected connections in outlets, switches and light fixtures containing aluminum wiring become increasingly dangerous as time passes. Poor connections cause wiring to overheat, creating a potential fire hazard. In addition to creating a potential fire hazard, the presence of aluminum wiring may have an effect on your insurance policy. You should ask your insurance agent whether the presence of aluminum wiring is a problem that requires changes to your policy language in order to ensure that your house is covered. Here are the reasons aluminum wiring connections deteriorate:

  • Thermal expansion and contraction: Even more than copper, aluminum expands and contracts with changes in temperature. Over time, this will cause connections to loosen.  When wires are poorly connected they overheat, which creates a potential fire hazard.
  • Vibration: Electrical current vibrates as it passes through wiring. This vibration is more extreme in aluminum than it is in copper and as time passes, it can cause connections to loosen. Again, when wires are poorly connected they overheat, which creates a potential fire hazard.
  • Oxidation: Exposure to oxygen in the air causes deterioration to the outer surface of wire. This process is called oxidation. Aluminum wire is more easily oxidized than copper wire and as time passes, this process can cause problems with connections. Again, when wires are poorly connected they overheat, which creates a potential fire hazard.
  • Galvanic corrosion: When two different kinds of metal are connected to each other a very low-voltage electrical current is created which causes corrosion. Corrosion causes poor connections.

More information is available at this comprehensive website. http://www.inspect-ny.com/aluminum/aluminum.htm

Options for Correction:

The wiring should be evaluated by a qualified electrician. This means an electrician experienced in evaluating and correcting aluminum wiring problems. Not all electrical contractors qualify.  1. At a minimum, all connections should be checked and an anti-oxidant paste applied.

  1. Aluminum wire can be spliced to copper wire at the connections using approved wire nuts (called "pigtailing", not recommended by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission.)
  2. Copalum crimps can be installed. Although this is the safest option, Copalum Crimps are expensive (typically around $50 per outlet, switch or light fixture).
  3. AlumiConn Connectors
  4. Complete home re-wire. Costs will vary. Consult with a qualified electrical contractor.

 

Bootleg ground- QC

Electrical receptacles in the home had bootleg grounds. “Bootleg” ground is the term used to describe a condition in which, in a home with no equipment grounding system and that has had a 3-prong receptacle installed, the grounding lug of the receptacle has been wired to the receptacle neutral lug. This condition is a potential electrical shock/electrocution hazard. An evaluation of the home electrical system and any necessary work should be performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

Light fixture no response

A light fixture in the _____ did not respond to the switch.  The bulb may need to be replaced or there may be a problem with the switch, wiring or light fixture.  If after the bulb is replaced this light still fails to respond to the switch, this condition may represent a potential fire hazard and an evaluation and any necessary repairs should be performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

Light fixture overheating- QC

A recessed light fixture in the _____ exhibited signs of overheating such as intermittent shut off. Overheating light fixtures are a potential fire hazard. An evaluation and any necessary repairs should be performed by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

 

PLUMBING

Polybutylene- warning- QC

Home water distribution pipes were Polybutylene.

Polybutylene piping similar in appearance to piping in this home has been the subject of a national class action lawsuit involving certain polybutylene plumbing systems and polybutylene yard service lines installed between January 1, 1978 through July 31, 1995. The system may become weak and fail without warning with the potential to cause significant water damage to the building structure and personal property. Consult with a qualified plumbing contractor to determine the need for replacement of Polybutylene water distribution pipes.

 

PVC improper- QC

Hot water distribution pipes included PVC. PVC is not an approved material for this purpose. All PVC pipes should be replaced with pipes of an approved material by a qualified contractor.

 

Dissimilar metal hangers, copper pipe- QC

Copper water distribution pipes were hung from hardware made from a metal other than copper. This condition has resulted in galvanic corrosion of the copper pipes that- if not corrected- will cause premature failure of the pipes that will require their replacement. Correction should be made by a qualified plumbing contractor.

 

No main cleanout

The inspector was unable to locate a cleanout for the main sewer pipe. To faciitate clearing blockages, a full-size cleanout be located within 5 feet of the foundation in line with the building drain and sewer. This condition may complicate the clearing of any blockages that might develop.

 

Ejector pump lid missing gasket- QC

The sewer ejector pump lid was missing a gasket. This will allow sewer gases to enter the living space and should be corrected by a qualified contractor.

 

TPR termination not visible- QC

The termination point of the discharge pipe for the water heater temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve was not readily observable.  The termination should be visible to help ensure that the termination is never capped. 

 

TPR connected to waste pipe- QC

The discharge pipe of the water heater temperature/pressure relief (TPR) valve was connected directly to a waste pipe. Because the discharge pipe has no trap, this condition may allow toxic sewer gas to enter the living space. This condition should be corrected by a qualified contractor.

 

WH flue connected below furnace flue- QC

Where the exhaust vent of this water heater and a furnace both connected to a common exhaust flue, the water heater vent connected below the furnace vent. Generally-accepted modern safety standards mandate that when water heaters and furnaces connect to a common flue, the water heater flue should connect above the furnace flue. This condition is improper and should be corrected by a qualified HVAC or plumbing contractor.

 

Backdrafting

This gas-fired water heater was backdrafting at the time of the inspection. "Backdrafting" is a condition in which the invisible, odorless, tasteless, toxic products of combustion from the water heater combustion exhaust vent leak into the living space. Excessive exposure to these products of combustion can result in injury or death. An evaluation and any necessary corrections should be performed by a qualified plumbing contractor.

 

 

HVAC

Boiler

Displaced diverter- QC

The draft diverter of the gas-fired boiler had been displaced, was improperly aligned and may allow the toxic products of combustion to leak into the living space. Excessive human exposure to the toxic products of combustion can result in injury or death. This condition should be corrected by a qualified HVAC contractor.

 

No sediment trap/drip leg- QC

No sediment trap or drip leg was installed at this boiler. Sediment traps and drip legs are installed to keep particulates and moisture out of the gas valve. Particulates or moisture in the gas valve can interfere with boiler burner operation. The Inspector recommends installation of a sediment trap/drip leg by a qualified plumbing contractor.

 

Protect radiant tubing

Plastic heat distribution pipes for the radiant in-floor heating system were exposed to damage from abrasion or impact. These pipes should be protected from damage.

 

Furnace

Vent: clearance from combustibles - QC

The B-vent serving as the furnace vent connector had inadequate clearance from combustible materials. B-vent requires a minimum 1-inch clearance from combustible materials. This condition is a potential fire hazard. The Inspector recommends that this condition be corrected by a qualified contractor.

 

Vent discharges into exterior chimney- QC

The furnace vent connector discharged into a brick chimney that was attached to the outside of the structure. This condition can result in inadequate exhausting of combustion gasses to the exterior due to excessive gas cooling. Proper venting should be installed by a qualified HVAC contractor.

 

 

ATTIC

Purlin bears on ceiling joists- sagging- QC

Bracing of the purlin system designed to support rafters was installed in a manner that transferred the roof load to ceiling joists. This condition has caused ceiling joists to sag. Sagging will probably worsen over time unless steps are taken to correct this condition. An evaluation and any necessary work should be performed by a qualified contractor.

 

Rafters: top cuts bad- OK

Plumb cuts where rafters connected to the ridge were badly cut. This condition reduces the strength of these connections. This is an example of poor quality work but did not appear to affect the structural integrity of the roof framing.

 

Rafters: top cuts bad- QC

Plumb cuts where rafters connected to the ridge were badly cut and fit poorly. This condition significantly reduces the strength of these connections. You should consult with a qualified framing contractor to discuss the need- and cost- for correction.

 

Ridge sags- over-spanned rafter ties- QC

The ridge sagged visibly. You should consult with a qualified contractor to discuss methods and costs for correction/stabilization of the roof structure.

 

No ridge- OK

The home was built with no ridge installed as part of the roof structure. This was not an uncommon building practice during the time period in which this house was built and is not a defect.

 

Connector fasteners undersize- SE

In the roof framing, fasteners used with metal connectors were undersized. Structural engineers perform calculations based on known connector/fastener strengths in designing safe structures. To perform as designed, metal connectors should have all holes filled with the fasteners specified by the hardware manufacturer. The Inspector recommends evaluation by a structural engineer to determine whether safe conditions exist.

 

Site-built trusses- SE

Roof trusses appeared to have been built on-site instead of being assembled in a manufacturing facility. This indicates that trusses were not designed, inspected or approved by a structural engineer. Trusses that lack proper engineering may be structurally inadequate and have the potential for catastrophic structural failure. The roof trusses should be evaluated by a structural engineer.

 

3/8" plywood roof sheathing

The roof appeared to be sheathed with 3/8-inch plywood. Although this is not considered acceptable by modern standards, it was considered acceptable at the time the home was originally constructed. Houses are not required to be upgraded to comply with newly-enacted building codes or standards. 3/8-inch plywood used as roof sheathing does not constitute a defective condition.

 

Low-quality methods/materials

Methods and materials used in building the conventionally-framed roof structure were typical of lower quality homes.

 

Exposed electrical splices

Energized electrical splices not contained within a junction box and exposed to touch were visible in the attic. Electrical splices should be contained within an approved junction box with a cover plate installed. This condition is a shock/electrocution and potential fire hazard and should be corrected by a qualified electrical contractor.

 

 

GARAGE

No curb at living space

No curb was installed between the garage floor and the floor of the adjacent living space. This may allow moisture from snowmelt or other sources to migrate beneath the wall and damage floor-covering materials or floor structure in the living space. The Inspector recommends sealing the base of the garage wall at the floor to prevent future moisture damage to interior floor materials.

 

Microbial growth- past

Garage interior walls had discoloration indicating possible microbial growth such as mold. Confirmation would require laboratory analysis. This condition typically indicates a moisture problem. The moisture meter showed elevated levels of moisture in the wall materials at the time of the inspection, indicating that intrusion has been recent and ongoing. The source of moisture should be identified and the condition corrected to avoid damage to the home structure and materials and the development of conditions that may encourage microbial growth.

 

Insecurely mounted door tracks- QC

Overhead garage door tracks were insecurely mounted, moved excessively when the door was operated, and should be secured by a qualified contractor.

 

Button installed too low- QC

The garage door push-button switch was lower than the recommended 5-foot minimum height above the standing surface. This condition is potentially dangerous to children. The switch should be raised for safety reasons. 

 

No re-connect at testing- QC

The overhead vehicle door would not reconnect after testing of the manual disconnect. Correction should be made by a qualified contractor or technician.

 

 

LOG HOME

Handcrafted- scribed

The home was of a type commonly called "Handcrafted". The exterior walls of Handcrafted homes are constructed using naturally-shaped logs which are scribed (marked) and cut in a manner which allows each log to fit tightly over the log in the course below. The skill and accuracy with which logs are scribed and cut, along with a gasket material typically installed in the groove between log courses, work together to resist heat, air, moisture and insect movement through the wall structure.

 

Not self-draining- QC

Exterior wall corner notches did not appear to be designed to be self-draining. This may result in premature failure of the wall structure at these areas due to wood decay caused by elevated moisture levels. The Inspector recommends an appropriate sealant be applied at any such corners.

 

Partial detachment, mortar-based chinking- QC

Log wall exteriors had cement-based chinking which was detached in some areas. The overall amount of detachment appeared to be less than the 30% at which it is recommended that all chinking be removed and replaced. The Inspector recommends that any detached exterior wall chinking be removed and replaced with an appropriate chinking material. Consult with a qualified contractor to determine options and costs for this work.

 

No bond breaker installed

Chinking at the home appeared to be improperly installed. Proper chinking method includes the installation of a bond breaker between log courses. The purpose of the bond breaker is to limit chinking adhesion to two points, the upper and lower logs in the course. Failure to install a bond breaking device may limit the ability of the chinking to expand and contract with the logs to which it is adhered. No bond breaker was installed in the representative areas viewable by the inspector. This condition can result in premature failure of the chinking system and the need for replacement of the chinking- a potentially expensive project. There is no correction for this condition, but you should be aware that it exists.

 

Log gables- OK-newer home

Gabled ends were constructed using logs. The home was newer and may experience log shrinkage and the resultant wall settling in the future. This settling will include walls that form the gabled ends. Roof structure problems can develop when the ridge rafter is attached to stable rafters along its length but attached to settling gabled walls at its ends. Although the gabled ends appeared to be in serviceable condition at the time of the inspection, the point at which the roof ridge rafter attaches to the gabled end walls should be monitored annually until the log walls have finished settling. This is usually two to five years from the time of original construction, depending on the wood species and homesite environment.

 

Clearance from grade

Bottom (sill) wall logs were less than the recommended 20 inches above grade. Logs near the ground are more vulnerable to insect attack and moisture/decay problems from splashback and/or snowdrift. You should be diligent in maintaining the exterior finish coating and keep vegetation cut back form the exterior walls.